Do You Need to Write Every Day?

We writers have been told to write every day—no matter what. I would agree with that, but I think it really doesn’t matter what we write, as long as we stay in the habit of writing.

Letter writing, blogging, answering emails, writing Thank-You notes, and so on. Let’s not forget the occasional magazine article, Letter to the Editor, or skit for a club or church group.  These may be just as valuable in developing our writing abilities as in our writing that is devoted strictly to our “books.”

The important thing is not to get lazy and forget what we’re about. Writing is just like any other habit. If it isn’t cultivated, it dies on the vine.

You’ve heard that the only way out of the forest is through the trees. And, it follows that the only way to get a book written is to write!  

I’ve formed the habit of writing in the mornings, taking a break for lunch and a short walk, then coming back to my computer to reread what I wrote a few hours earlier. I often edit and rewrite a little. Sometimes I keep going until exhaustion sets in. 

When I’ve given it my all and have no more to give, I head for bed. Five days of that routine and I reward myself by switching gears completely on the weekend. I help my husband with whatever renovation project he’s got going. Totally different than writing, it rejuvenates me and gets me ready for another five days in front of my computer.

Care to share your writing routine? Tell us what energizes you.

Rewritten from an earlier post.

Simple Changes To Give You That Spark

I write in my home office. But there are many places to write that are relaxing, inspirational, and energizing. Sometimes a simple change of scenery might be just what a writer needs to kick-start their writing day.

There are endless possibilities: on a lounge chair in the backyard under a leafy tree; in the comfy reading chair in the bedroom; at the kitchen table with a cup of coffee; floating on a raft in the swimming pool; on a park bench; in a gazebo; by a fish pond; in a coffee house; on a porch swing; in a flower garden; near a waterfall; in the corner of a bookstore.

Do you love to travel? Compile a writing bucket list: sitting near Niagara Falls; overlooking the ocean; in a warm cabin with snow falling outside; on a deserted island; on a sailboat; in the rainforest; at the top of Mount Everest; at the base of the Statue of Liberty; in an art museum; on an airplane; in a hot air balloon; on the porch of the Grand Hotel on Macinaw Island.

You can also change when to write: at sunset; at dawn; during a blizzard; in the middle of the night; after a good meal; on a spring morning.

When’s the best time for you to write, emotionally? Choose an intensely emotional time: when extremely happy; sad; feeling ‘blue’; lonely; angry; frustrated…. 

Changes in the where and when can be used to give authors that spark—that edge.