Journey Thru the Genres

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This week, our focus is on four additional genres: Drama, Crime, Horror, and Science Fiction.

 

Drama:  Mostly written for the movies and theatre, this genre makes use of prose, verse, and/or scenes. (Think of Westside Story and Julius Caesar).

Crime: The focus is on how the criminal gets caught. Action and dialogue are used to express conflict and emotion. (Notably Crime and Punishment by Dostoyevsky).

Horror: the goal of this genre is to create feelings of fear and dread. Any technique that creates those feelings is fair game. (Fahrenheit 451 and Dracula).

Science Fiction: As a stand alone, or included to some degree in other genres, science fiction examines the past, current, and future impact of science on our culture and society. (Current: Black Autumn and Catalyst).

Next week, we will continue our Journey thru Genres.

Writing Mysteries and Thrillers

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Mysteries and Thrillers are cousins to Suspense, but they differ in focus.

In a suspense, something is about to happen.

In a mystery, something has already happened.

In suspense, the protagonist strives to get out of a puzzle.

 

 

In a mystery, the protagonist often strives to get into a puzzle.

A mystery, focuses on the crime, which usually happens early in the book. The rest of the story centers around the hero’s pursuit of the villain.

Now, about thrillers: The are extremely fast-paced, whereas a suspense story can have just about any pace.

A thriller is large in scale, perhaps involving the fate of the world as we know it—and the hero often knows who the villain is.

The focus of a thriller? Stopping the villain.

And, it’s as simple as that.

“How-To” books you may be interested in:  Writing the Mystery by G. Miki Hayden; Writing and Selling Your Mystery Novel by Hallie Ephron; How to Write a Damn Good Thriller by James N. Frey; and Writing a Killer Thriller by Jodie Renner.

Famous Mystery and Thriller writers: Lee Child, Stephen King, John Grisham,       James Patterson, Michael Connelly.

(Next week, we’ll talk about the difference between classic fiction and fan fiction).

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