Creative Networking

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At a recent book sale, my table was sandwiched in between two watercolor artists.

Next to one of them was a young lady selling delicious homemade cookies.

Beyond her was a married couple designing one-of-a-kind T-shirts.

On and on, down the line, there was a nice mix of artists, crafters, and authors.

All brought unique opportunities to network.

Here’s what I learned on that chilly Saturday morning.

We shouldn’t limit ourselves to only making connections with others in our same profession or field of interest. Authors can also make use of opportunities to network creatively with many other individuals.

Just because they may not be authors, doesn’t mean they are non-readers, you know. You need to meet, great, and exchange cards with everyone.

Ask yourself, “What is the connection I can make with a painter?” Well, do you ever need an illustrator? When your book is written, will you need a cover?

T-shirts? How about one displaying the cover of your most recent book…main character…catchy quotation?

But, a baker?  Hum…are you writing a cookbook?

I’m not, but I have a partially-written—and long-forgotten—novel in the bottom drawer of my desk. It has the word “Cookie” in the title. That’s enough for me to start a conversation with the gal selling Snickerdoodles.

You never know who you’ll meet.

So, wherever you go, look for ways to connect.

You just might end up with a free sample.

Chocolate chip…pumpkin spice…oatmeal raisin…

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Hang a Wreath

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I went to one of my favorite hobby stores last week. After spending an hour there and filling my cart, I joined other shoppers in the check-out line.

I saw quite a few people purchasing seasonal wreaths. Some bore the symbols of Halloween while others were decorated with fall leaves and Thanksgiving messages.

Wreaths are a colorful and fun way to send a subtle message to friends and neighbors, in much the same way as decals and vanity plates on cars.

Since our writing has messages that are more pointed–more in-depth–within their pages, we might want to think of our covers as wreathes for our books.

The artwork and titles—even the colors and fonts that are used—all work together to form a subtle impression for the purchaser.

It is the entire “package” that entices a reader to buy. Careful thought to even the smallest detail can mean the difference between a sale or casual glance as they walk on by.