Are You In Editing Mode?

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At it stands, now, I have gone through the editing process with six books. I learn more each time I get to this step in the publishing process. So, for what it’s worth, I recommend you use these people, in this order:

Do an ongoing edit of your manuscript, as you share your submissions with your critique group, chapter by chapter, from Prologue thru Epilogue.

When your book is finished, edit your manuscript yourself (at least a couple of times—more, if you are a perfectionist, like me).

Send it to your Beta Readers. They will catch a few things, too.

Send it to your Editor and make the suggested corrections.

Finally, let your Critique Group Read it in its entirety. Note: This is a new step. Here’s why I am suggesting taking the time to do this: my group accepts submissions from each other twice per month.

Often the chapters are out of order. And, because this process can take upward of one year, it is not like reading a book, chapter by chapter. They miss the flow and this especially affects the understanding of the timeline. (It isn’t their fault. These two factors make it almost impossible for them to give good feedback in this area).

If your critique group agrees to read each other’s work–all the way through, one last time–they will be able to experience your story from beginning to end and catch any glitches.

Yes, it is a bigger commitment and not for the faint of heart, but if you are truly committed to help each other be the best you can be, then the results can be of great value.

In talking with my group, they were positive about trying this approach—at least once.

I suspect it will be time well spent.

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2019 Is Your Year

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Editing is the polishing before your book is published. It is at this point that you place your manuscript in the hands of your editor.

So, what are you looking to get for your dollars spent?

Well, it depends on how much you have done on your own prior to this point. Some writers will need proofreading for typos and grammar, others will want a more in-depth analysis of their story to make sure that it rings “true” with the time period in which it takes place. The editor will make sure that clothing, automobiles, literature, expressions of speech, political references, inventions, references to movies, and so on accurately reflect the calendar year (or decade) as precisely and truthfully as possible.

In one book, I researched “rabbit ears” for television reception. In another, the year of the first Cadillac Coupe de Ville was the issue, and so on.

Some editors will also see that your book is correctly formatted. Others will leave that entirely up to the publisher.

Each kind of editing has a fee attached to it. You can contract the editor to do as much—or as little—editing of your manuscript as you deem helpful.

It is at this point, while I am waiting to get my story back from the editor, that I spend time on my cover image and copy. I usually select three covers I like and then run a Facebook contest to chose the winner. This process stirs up some publicity about my upcoming book, which is a bonus.

At whatever point in the writing process you are now working— prewriting, drafting, revising, or editing—I encourage you to keep on keeping on. 

2019 will be your year, if you don’t let anything distract you and you keep moving ahead toward your goal.