Looking Back and Going Forward

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Looking back over your last year of writing, have you made adjustments or have you kept doing whatever it was that you were doing on January 1?

My guess is you’ve made changes along the way, learned things, broke some bad habits, and put into practice new techniques.

You are looking at the craft of writing in a much different way than you did a year ago. 

The overall goal of writing is improvement. So is the goal of revising our manuscript once the draft is complete. 

I view revising as dissecting—just like we did in science class in high school.

It’s taking my story apart and looking at/improving each individual section, and then putting it all back together again.

It may have been impossible to put Humpty Dumpty back together again, but not so with your writing. It can be changed, reworked, rewritten, reordered until it looks much different than it did in draft form.

I begin by either selecting my known weaknesses to work on or, just what I deem important.  I go through the entire book (focusing on one at a time) looking for those things and “fixing” them. In my first book, for instance, I noticed that each chapter began with the main character’s name. So, I rewrote each beginning paragraph.

You’ll need to determine for yourself just what things are necessary. Here is the list of what I go through:

Repetitious words, past tense verbs, emotions, descriptions, flow.

I check each character’s description against my master list. If Sally has green eyes in chapter one, they’d better be the same color in chapter fourteen.

Quotation marks, italics, indentations, misspellings, etc.

Last lines of each scene (I make sure they entice the reader to keep turning the page).

Timeline/order (I once read a book where the girl’s cat died in chapter 14. Then, in chapter 15, the cat was very much alive and purring on her lap!) You don’t want huge mistakes like this to spoil your story.

Seasons/holidays (If these are mentioned in the book, they need to be in sequence) Ages (pay attention to age progression throughout).

As you can see, the list is long. I add to it for each new story, it seems.

No book will be perfect, but look especially for the mistakes you know that you tend to make over and over again. Keep polishing until your story gleams!

Next week, editing. 

 

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Online Editing Programs

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Today’s blog is short and sweet—Part 1 of a two-part series on Online Editing Programs.

A couple of weeks ago, a writer-friend told me about an online manuscript editing tool, AUTOCRIT, that automates the most tedious editing tasks for him. 

It has helped him in the areas of dialogue, excessive use of adverbs, identifying cliches, repetitious words/phrases, pacing of sentences and paragraphs, and so on. The software works with the internet browser to give summary reports, overviews, and suggestions. 

A writer uploads their work into AUTOCRIT, polishes it in more than 20 areas based on his designated genre. When satisfied with the result, the revised copy is then exported back into the original writing program (say, WORD, for example).

I signed up for a 7-Day-Free trial. I found AUTOCRIT to be easy to understand and use. It really helped me see things I was doing—and correct them—while writing. I liked having my chapter look and sound great BEFORE sending it on to a LIVE editor.

To be sure, this isn’t the only online editing program available. So, before I commit to AutoCrit’s reasonable monthly fee, I have another to check out.

I will post results/findings on it next week.

If you are like me, you want your finished book to be the best it can be. So, while you are waiting on my next blog post, you may want to check out AUTOCRIT for yourself.