Journey Ended

 

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Today is the Grand Finale of our Journey Through the Genres. The last five genres to peruse are:

Historical: This genre offers readers events and fictional characters that occur within a historical setting. Some authors even include real people that interact with the fictional characters.  

Humor: This genre’s goal is entertainment. However, it should also convey an underlying concept.

Realism: These stories are true to life or sometimes may simply be “inspired” by real events. (Example: The TV series Law and Order.)

Short Stories: This type of story may fit into any number of genres, but is so short that there is only one plot—no sub-plots. 

Westerns: These stories take place in the Old West, usually in the late 1800s or early 1900s. They may include the other genres of romance, suspense, and/or realism.

So, that’s it. We’ve covered quite a bit these past five or six weeks. It is always good to refresh our memories as to what genres are available to us. Why not try writing a scene in several different genres? It may not only be fun, but you may be inspired to see what writing a longer version might lead to…

Flash Fiction

 

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There are many different types of creative writing. 

Let’s look at a relatively new idea called Flash Fiction.  As its name implies, it refers to a very short story ranging in length from 300 words to 1,000 words.

Even though extremely brief, Flash fiction still offers character and plot development. Requirements? It must have a beginning, middle, and an end. (We’ll take a look at this in my next blog and determine how difficult the actual writing of Flash Fiction might be…)

 

Sometimes referred to as the minisaga, microfiction, sudden fiction, the nanotale, micro-story, and the postcard, flash fiction has its roots in fables and parables.

In France, they are called novellas; in China, they are referred to as pocket-size stories, minute-long stories, and the smoke-long story (just long enough to read while smoking a cigarette).

Examples of early Flash Fiction are Aeosop’s Fables in the west and Jataka tales in India. You may be familiar with short stories of the 1930’s, collected in anthologiies, such as The American Short Short Story.

Access to the Internet has enhanced an awareness of flash fiction, with online journals being devoted entirely to the style. Examples are the SmokeLong Quarterly, Wigleaf, Flash Fiction Online and Flash Fiction Magazine.

Social media has enabled a rapid spread of this genre. Such publishers as The Anonymous Writer and The Third Word Press use flash fiction to create stories online.

Learn how to write Flash Fiction in my next blog.