Does This Back Cover Copy Tempt You?

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Back cover copy is important. People read it hoping it will give them clues  as to what the story is about, how the book ends and if it reading it will be worth their time spent.

From an author’s perspective, it is an opportunity to tempt the reader into reading their book by hooking them into the story and hinting at the outcome.

Here is the back cover copy for my latest book. Does it accomplish its purpose? Only time will tell…

Truth or Dare is a childhood game—or is it?

Simon Wilson is a bully. A Thief. An Accomplished liar.

But the biggest lie of all is not one he has told. It’s one he believes.

It’s the one that says he will never be good enough. He will never measure up. Never be worthy.

He is at a crossroads.

Will Simon continue to be deceived by the lie?

Or will he choose to believe the Truth?

To Query or Not to Query

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What is a Query Letter and why should you send one to an agent?

We’ve all done queries when we type a request for information into the search bar at the top of our computer screen.

A Query Letter is a little bit different, however. Put simply, a query letter is a single page cover letter, introducing you and your book.

It is NOT A RESUME.

It is three concise paragraphs, which include the hook, the mini synopsis, and the writer’s biography.

The Hook, or paragraph one:  A concise, one-sentence tagline for your book meant to snag your reader’s interest and reel them in.

The Mini-synopsis, or paragraph two: This is your novel, reduced to one paragraph. (Yikes! Are you kidding me?)

Writer’s biography, or paragraph three: Keep it short and related only to your writing.

Close your letter by thanking the agent for his/her time and consideration. If your book is nonfiction, include the outline and table of contents.

If your book is fiction, ask the agent to request the full contents, if interested.

The internet has many examples of query letters—both bad and good—available. It will be well worth your time to read some so that you get a good feel for what agents expect.

As my father always said, “It never hurts to ask…”

Post on Buzzfeed

 

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Another in our list of strategies for selling more books is to submit a post to Buzzfeed. Begin with a clever tie-in to your book. Then, write a short article about your book in a unique format—say a riddle or a quiz about your main characters. For example, “Would Max or Rhoda be most likely to try Scuba Diving?” A crossword puzzle or a word search could also be a possibility.

Anything is fair game as long as it hooks your potential reader!!